Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Stormy Happenings

 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I watched the effects of the storm from Olly's bedroom window yesterday. The waves were crashing up and over the top of the lighthouse at Godrevy. They were smashing into the coastline around the bay. The waves were wondrously huge. Magnificent and powerful. The winds battered our white house on the hill, and the rain fell in torrential downpours throughout the day. The back roads have been flooded. We have had terrific hail storms, and this afternoon a solitary - but almighty - clap of thunder, that made me jump out of my skin.
 
I wandered down to Porthmeor this morning. Poor Honey hasn't been out since my last post. A combination of the weather and being knocked bandy by the lurgy meant that she had to suffer in silence on the sofa. Olly was ill. Marc was ill. I was ill. I even took myself to bed on Saturday. Unheard of, although I suspect Marc was glad to see the back of me. I am not good with a cold. I can handle pain, but colds bring out the absolute worse in me. For example, I shuffled round and round the house moaning about how shabby everything looked. And although it does a bit, I normally don't really mind. I am usually pretty realistic with my household expectations. Three boys does curtail any desire for perfectly white walls. But I digress..
 
Even though the winds weren't as high as yesterday, it was still pretty wild out at sea. There were terrific surges up the beach, and the breakers were huge and capped by flamboyant white crests as they rolled into land. It wasn't menacing. It was joyful, as if the sea had broken free of its shackles and was having fun. That's how it seemed to me at any rate. The sea is so often described as moody and malevolent when it's in this kind of state, and for good reason. I wouldn't risk standing as close to the harbour walls as some people did yesterday. The sea is not concerned for your safety after all.
 
And I am always in awe of it's power. I am often struck by it's contrary nature. The way it can lure you into a false sense of security. How gentle it can seem on those long summer days, with barely a wisp of a breeze to coax it into action. How it giggles, as it ripples around your toes paddling in the shallows. And then how it's mood can change. The sea can send those rolling waves up and over us. Catching us out, and taking our feet out from beneath us. I've never let the boys get too comfortable with the sea. Call me cautious, but I think it's best not to pick a fight with someone you've not got a chance of beating.
 
But today the sea was energised. And it seemed to me that it was releasing it's energy for the sheer hell of it. And it gave a little of that energy to me. It allowed me to stand and stare and be part of it. It provided a backdrop to a landscape full of the most gorgeous tones and textures. It played a symphony of noise that was joyful to hear. The sea beckoned me in a little, and then chased me back up the beach laughing all the while.
 
I bumped into a old chap going for his daily constitutional. "Look at that!" he said "Those stripes of colour. Isn't it grand!" It was. It was grand. We stood there looking out towards the horizon. "Wonderful stuff," he said "Take a picture." And I did.
 
Leanne xx
 
*
 
I really do meet these lovely people, you know. I was always a very shy person, but I'm making up for it now. Rather late in life I've learnt that a smile and a hello goes a long way, and people are brilliant in the main. The old chap I mentioned today has been doing the same daily walk since his retirement twenty five years ago. In all weathers, he says. And he tells me that he never tires of it, because there is always something different to see, or someone new to talk to. And he gave Honey a fuss and a cuddle. You can tell a lot about a person by the way they talk to your dog. I liked him very much indeed.
 
 
 
 
 
 

27 comments:

  1. Leanne, hubby and I were just reading the news a few hours ago and watching video of the terrible winds and enormous waves there in Cornwall. I do hope you'll remain safe and warm in your little, cosy while house. We're also hoping the weather will tame down soon, as we'll be moving back to England at the end of summer here.
    xx

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    1. Hey Alexandria,
      Yes we were perfectly safe. A friend's balcony was torn down though. Will you be moving to Cornwall when you return?
      L x

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  2. Hi Leanne. How nice to meet random people and chat to them. I am quite notorious for talking to strangers. I love doing that. It is easy with a dog, or a cute kid. Glad you are well enough for a walk. Your photos convey the power of the waves beautifully. Have a lovely Thursday. Christina xx

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  3. I love the sea when it's so full of energy. We braved it up in Hartland a couple of years ago during one of these storms. Exhilarating.

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  4. They're incredible photos and he's right, it's never the same.

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  5. Hi Leanne. My husband being far more outgoing than the traditionally British reserved me taught me the simple joys of saying hello. I've met some wonderful people on the walks I've taken Rocky on. I did think of you after seeing the pictures of the storm in the news, I'm glad you came out unaffected xx

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  6. Grand photos indeed. I think you're right to have been wary - just heard on the Today programme that a woman was hit by a wave, swept 50ft and crashed into a boat, breaking her arm - she was probably lucky! Your old gentleman sounds lovely. Happy storm watching. xx

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    1. A poor chap working for the rspca seems to have been swept to sea at Porthcurno. It is v sad.
      L xx

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  7. Sorry, forgot to add - hope you're feeling better! xx

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  8. It's funny how as you get older you become less shy. It's a pity it doesn't come when you are 18 and really need confidence.

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  9. Oh what a wonderful post. I yearn for the sea sometimes, and now is one of those times, having read your words. The waves are spectacular in wild weather aren't they. I think it's my favourite. I know what you mean about the dangers of the water though. I've seen the rescue helicopter called out on a balmy day because a surfer didn't realise the current was so strong. The locals told me it happens every few days at least. Everyone is coming down with colds here too I think. It's half term at the moment, so we have the pleasure of each other's company for it all. Plus there is a birthday to be celebrated. It's nice to have a chat to people who are out and about isn't it. More so by the sea I think, people are disposed to pause and stare out to the distant horizon. Enjoy the rest of the week. CJ xx

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  10. It was very stormy, glad you are feeling better, I love the sea in all weathers, it's ever changing. hope you have a better weekxx

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  11. LOVE the photos - you are so lucky to be near the sea and I also love the thought of it releasing its energy for the sheer hell of it. Really wish I did that! And also glad you're feeling better x

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    1. Hey CB,
      Thank you. A walk along the beach is very good for a cold.
      L xx

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  12. That does look wonderful stuff! The sea too felt energized here on Sunday. It must be fantastic spending the last 25 years looking at that changing view every day! I hope you meet that man again! I too have changed in the last few years since blogging and will now talk to anyone! Hope you are all feeling better. Sarah x

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  13. The man you met sounds great! Perhaps you will see him again sometime and say hello. I find it much easier to strike up a conversation with strangers. Glad you got out and about! xx

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  14. That's what I love about walking. Generally people will stop and chat during the day or at least say hello. The sea is wonderful. So many moods. So many different states. I am looking forward to the days soon when it's transparent and calm and ready for me to go for a swim. Maybe in a month or so. B xx

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    1. A swim? You are brave! You should check out the st Ives mermaid in instagram.
      L xx

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  15. Wonderful photos of the wild Cornish sea. I love the way the gulls coast over waves looking for fish and flotsam.

    We currently have the lurgy so I sympathise!

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  16. I really enjoyed this post and your descriptions of the storm. Living in landlocked Shropshire I miss the sea a lot. I also sympathise with your lurgy having had a cold that stayed for two weeks!

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  17. I chat to everyone I meet too- have had some wonderful and funny conversations that way over the years. As always, I so love your pictures of the sea and am also in awe of its power. I think M and I will be down your way for a weekend over the summer/ autumn in which case I shall drop in and see you :o) XX

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  18. I used to be mortified when my mum chatted to strangers (she'd get someone's life story in the supermarket queue) when I was a child. Now I'll happily chat to anyone, especially when I'm walking the dog. Your descriptions of the sea are fabulous.

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  19. he was right. it was indeed grand!

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  20. Such lovely photos Leanne. I would love to live closer to the sea. We're off to the coast for a few days next week so I'll get my sea fix. I'm more likely ot speak to someone now than I was even a few years ago. I'm still not as friendly as my Mum who even now will turn to anyone and talk the hind leg off a donkey!! Are you on half term next week? Have a good one. xx

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  21. I used to squirm with embarrassment when my grandmother talked to strangers on the bus too. Now I am very likely to chat to anyone and everyone and I have met some lovely people that way. It is one of the unexpected pleasures of getting older!

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  22. Waves OVER the lighthouse?! Blimey.

    Absolutely amazing photos by the way. xx

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