Wednesday, 6 January 2016

Looking For The Whales

 






 
In past few days, there have been hump back whales spotted in St Ives Bay. It's the big sweep of water that hugs the curve of the land from Godrevy to St Ives. It's where you can often spot pods of dolphins and seals. It's where the sea birds hunt for food. It's where Marc goes sailing on Saturday, and people who hire those awful speed boats go careering up and down during the summer months. It's where the fishermen drop their lobster pots. It's a stretch of water that has my heart. Whether I'm stood looking out at it from Smeaton's Pier or the rocky outcrop above the lighthouse at Godrevy, it has me under its' spell.
 
This morning I walked with my friend to the Island to see if we could catch a glimpse of them. There were quite a few people already there, laden with binoculars and long lens cameras. They were in for the long game, judging by their waterproof attire and camouflage covers on their equipment. I spoke to a woman who had seen the whales breech yesterday afternoon. And a man who told me that there were huge shoals of Mackerel and Spratt in the bay, and it was this that had most likely attracted them in so close to the shore. I had wondered why there were so many different types of sea birds hanging about; gulls, oystercatchers, guillemot, cormorant, terns and the like.
 
It was a beautiful morning. There was no rain, and the wind had dropped. There were breaks in the clouds and the punctuating colours gave an otherworldly feel to the landscape. For the last few months, we have been bogged down in slate greys, drizzle and poor light. Today the sky was treating us to a technicolour display, which was pinky peach and purply hued. It was wonderful to stretch the legs underneath such a canopy, and I felt cleansed by it.
 
We weren't lucky enough to see the whales, and they have already moved on. But it's enough to know that they were there, gracing us with their majestic presence. Unaware of the fascination they hold for so many, and the excitement and wonder felt by the lucky few who have seen them. I may not have been lucky enough to have spotted these magnificent creatures, but I feel happy and humbled that they are there at all.
 
Have a great day.
 
Leanne xx
 
 


24 comments:

  1. Magical post. I've never seen a whale but I have seen basking sharks off Lundy and South Cornwall in recent years. Even the babies are six foot long, the adults are huge but quite harmless. When I was child and we used to sail out from Newrton Ferrers and fish for mackerel, basking sharks were very common, but now, perhaps like most wildlife, they are a rarity. But you are right, it is enough to know they are there in the deep blue sea.

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  2. It sounds like a very special place. When we lived in California we use to go whale watching and got to see them in Hawaii, it's an awesome sight.

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  3. Friend of mine windsurfed over a basker in SW Scotland, nearly died of shock! Aren't humpbacks filter feeders though, would they be interested in small fish? Or do the small fish indicate the presence of plankton?

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    1. I'm woefully ignorant Simon. Perhaps they were attracted by something else
      L x

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    2. Small fish and krill apparently

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  4. How lovely! And I love your pictures even without added whale :-) xx

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  5. Wonderful photos! The top one is especially beautiful - and not a bad way to spend a few hours on a January weekday x

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  6. It's funny how just knowing something is there, or has been there is enough. I've just discovered there's a Barn Owl living down the lane. I've seen him once, very briefly, but I get a warm feeling just knowing he's there. It's a feeling of connectiveness (is that even a word?). Lovely, lovely pictures as always. Good Old Sea, eh? XX

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  7. I'm with Winwick Mum. I don't think even a whale could make them any more beautiful.

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  8. What a beautiful place you live in. I can't believe you can walk to see whales. I hope you're feeling better lately, Leanne. Take care.

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  9. What a shame you didn't manage to see the whale but just to be out on the beach in the sunshine must have been wonderful. Your pictures are fantastic and I wish I had been there with you enjoying those sea views! Sarah x

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  10. There is something magical about the sea isn't there although I'm more a rock pool kind of gal myself. Lovely post I felt like I was almost there x

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  11. Whenever I read one of your posts I just want to get in the car and come down there. Fabulous shots.

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  12. What gorgeous photos, they really are, and how amazing to be able to walk somewhere like that on an ordinary day. The coast of Cornwall really is utterly enchanting. So much life, you never know what you'll see from one day to the next. CJ xx

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  13. Perhaps they will come for you another day! xx

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  14. Beautiful photo...we've spotted dolphins and seals in St Ives and got so excited about them, it's such a magical place.x

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  15. Your photos are breathtaking. I feel like I'm there. I'm sorry you didn't see the whales but you definitely captured some beauty. Xx

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  16. What a beautifully written post. What a privilege to read it . I do hope you manage to see the whales although just being there sounds special enough :) Barbara x

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  17. I had read about the whales and was hoping to go and have a look but knowing my luck they would be hiding. We went on a whale watching trip off Canada and didn't spot a single whale. Hoping to get down to see the seals at Godrevy at some stage at least they are easily spotted lying around the beach.

    St Ives bay is very much in my heart as well, happy childhood memories of summers spent on the dunes and beach at Gwithian. You never know we may bump into each other down there one day x

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  18. how wonderful to have them nearby x

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  19. This was a magical post, Leanne. It was about more than whales. It spoke of your love for the place you live and your joy in just knowing the whales were nearby. And such beautiful pictures!

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  20. How wonderful and I do agree with the joy of knowing they were there, whether you see them or not. It's enough to know the world has such things in it!

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  21. What a brilliant post - photographs, description everything make me long to return to Cornwall. You should work for the local tourist board as I'm sure others have, like me, visited Cornwall because of your blog.

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  22. My favourite photo is the one with the birds. Stunning X

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